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Rodeph Shalom Synagogue

A 1920s-era architectural marvel and home to the Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art

An interior view of Rodeph Shalom Synagogue.

An interior view of Rodeph Shalom Synagogue. Credit: R. Kennedy for GPTMC

Description

Built in 1927, Rodeph Shalom Synagogue is an outstanding example of the Byzantine style of architecture. Both the exterior and interior walls are covered with painted and carved geometric designs executed by the D’Ascenzo Studios. The sanctuary is lit by a large pendentive dome and contains handsome stained glass windows and a beautiful ark, supported on marble columns.

An earlier version of Rodeph Shalom was designed by Frank Furness in 1866. Located on the same lot, it was demolished during the 1920s to allow for the current, larger building to be built and to accommodate the construction of the Broad Street Subway.

As a congregation, Rodeph Shalom is committed to providing opportunities for members to participate in the four pillars of Jewish life: prayer, study, social action and community. The congregation celebrates a diversity of spiritual perspectives on ritual, study and Jewish practices.

Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art

The Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art (PMJA), located within Congregation Rodeph Shalom and founded in 1975, presents contemporary art exhibits that illuminate the Jewish experience. Organizing three solo and group shows a year, the Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art exhibits work by artists of diverse backgrounds. In addition to the special exhibits, the Museum features a permanent collection of works by artists including William Anastasi, Chaim Gross, Shelley Spector, Boaz Vaadia and Roman Vishniac, all of whom exhibited at the PMJA.

Visiting he PMJA is free and open to the public. (Entrance and parking on Mount Vernon Street.)

Hours (subject to change; call (215) 627-6747 to confirm):
Monday – Thursday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Friday: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Details

615 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19123
(215) 627-6747
Website

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