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  • Abraham Lincoln

    1871 by Randolph Rogers

    Statue of Abraham Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation.

    It may seem an unadventurous pose — sitting in a chair, holding a quill pen — but sculptor Randolph Rogers caught Lincoln in a heroic moment, signing the Emancipation Proclamation.

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  • Aero Memorial

    1948 by Paul Manship

    Aero Memorial

    To commemorate aviators who died in World War I, sculptor Paul Manship created an open bronze sphere that suggests the heavens and the earth, with intricate intertwined forms evoking the signs of the zodiac.

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  • All Wars Memorial to Colored Soldiers and Sailors

    1934 by J. Otto Schweizer

    All Wars Memorial to Colored Soldiers and Sailors

    Finely detailed sculptures of African American military men cluster about an allegorical figure representing Justice, who holds symbols of Honor and Reward. Above, American eagles surround a torch of life. First placed in West Fairmount Park, this work was moved to a prominent position on the Parkway in 1994.

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  • Art on City Hall

    Hundreds of sculptures by a single artist

    William Penn stands on top of City Hall

    Today it seems an unimaginable feat. Alexander Milne Calder, the first of the famous Calder family, created not only the statue of William Penn on City Hall Tower, but also most of the other 250-plus sculptures that adorn the massive building.

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  • Billy

    1914 by Albert Laessle

    The Billy Goat in Rittenhouse Square.

    A favorite of children as well as many adults, Billy, the small bronze goat, has graced the square since 1919. Sculptor Albert Laessle was born and trained in Philadelphia, and his bronze Penguins resides at the Philadelphia Zoo.

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  • Bolt of Lightning … A Memorial to Benjamin Franklin

    1984 by Isamu Noguchi

    Ben Franklin is memorialized in Isamu Noguchi’s Bolt of Lightning, a giant steel sculpture representing Franklin’s famous kite-flying experiment.

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  • City Hall

    The largest municipal building in the country and the finest example of the Second Empire style

    Philadelphia City Hall

    City Hall is the largest municipal building in the United States, containing over 14.5 acres of floor space. It is an architectural treasure inside and out.

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  • Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Memorial

    1927 by Hermon Atkins MacNeil

    Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Memorial

    Completed in 1927, the twin 40-foot pylons by Hermon Atkins MacNeil were intended as a gateway to Parkway gardens. Though moved to the northern edge of the square, they still function as a ceremonial entrance to the upper Parkway.

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  • Clothespin

    1976 by Claes Oldenburg

    Oldenburg’s Clothespin outside City Hall

    Philadelphia’s City Hall has inspired many reactions, but perhaps none quirkier than Claes Oldenburg’s. City Hall is formal, ornate late 19th century. Oldenburg’s 45-foot steel Clothespin, directly across 15th Street, is sleek, ultramodern, whimsical. Everyone has an opinion about the Clothespin. What’s yours?

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  • Covenant

    1974 by Alexander Liberman

    Covenant by Alexander Liberman

    Forty-five feet high, the red tubes of Alexander Liberman’s steel structure span Locust Walk, creating a focal point for Penn’s residential area. As the title indicates, the artist wanted to convey a feeling of bonding together for a high purpose. Besides being a pioneer in large abstract sculpture, Liberman had a major impact on fashion publishing, serving as art director for Vogue and editorial director of Condé Nast Publications.

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  • Cowboy

    1908 by Frederic Remington

    Frederic Remington's Cowboy

    The only large bronze by famous Western artist Frederic Remington, the Cowboy stares toward the river while his steed shies from a precipice. Remington himself chose this dramatic setting. The work is easy to miss if you’re speeding by, but unforgettable once you’ve seen it.

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  • Dilworth Plaza

    Undergoing renovations to become one of the city’s great green spaces

    Rendering of the renovated Dilworth Plaza, opening in 2014.

    Located at the foot of City Hall, Dilworth Plaza is undergoing a major transformation into a modern and welcoming outdoor space.

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  • Dream Garden

    Louis Comfort Tiffany meets Maxfield Parrish in a one-of-a-kind creation

    The Dream Garden

    One of only three such works ever undertaken by Tiffany Studios, the piece is comprised of 24 panels that took six months to install in its Philadelphia setting. In 1998, after the piece was put up for sale and casino magnate Steve Wynn attempted to purchase it, a citywide outcry nixed the deal, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts purchased its alumnus’ famous Dream Garden to make sure it would remain where it has always been.

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  • Duck Girl

    1911 by Paul Manship

    Duck Girl in Rittenhouse Square Park

    A young woman, classically draped (with a bit of strategic undraping), strides gracefully with a duck in one hand. No known symbolism invests this work; it’s just pleasant to look at. This is an early sculpture by Paul Manship, best known for his Prometheus in New York’s Rockefeller Center.

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  • Eagle

    1904 by August Gaul

    The Eagle in Macy's Grand Court.

    German sculptor August Gaul’s 2,500-pound bronze bird came to America for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. When John Wanamaker purchased it for his famous department store, he had to strengthen the floor with extra girders. Soon “Meet me at the eagle” became a catchphrase for Philadelphians as well as suburbanites who came downtown to shop.

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  • Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial

    1933–1961

    On a strip of land between the Schuylkill River and Kelly Drive, the Samuel Memorial tells the story of American life through sculpture. Chosen by means of three international exhibitions, the artists included several European immigrants and one from North Africa — fitting for a monument that stresses the nation’s openness, democracy and creative energy. Most of the works are fairly traditional in style, but Jacques Lipchitz’s bold Spirit of Enterprise dominates the central terrace.

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  • Face Fragment

    1975 by Arlene Love

    A giant, gilded mouth and nose, this sculpture will surely catch your eye, but it was designed as a tribute to other senses — namely, smell and taste, the research interests of the Monell Chemical Senses Center. Sculptor Arlene Love often favors partial figures, which allow her to concentrate on what she considers the essential nature of the subject.

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  • Fingerspan

    1987 by Jody Pinto

    The Fingerspan Bridge in the Wissahickon

    Ready for a more rugged hike? In the Wissahickon section of Fairmount Park, the “Form and Function” program commissioned a bridge that resembles a human finger, complete with a “nail” at one end. With this steel span across a picturesque gorge, artist Jody Pinto hoped to make hikers feel a literal connection between the human body and the natural world.

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  • General Ulysses S. Grant

    1897 by Daniel Chester French and Edward C. Potter

    Though less adventurous on his horse than the Cowboy, General Grant presents an imposing figure in this monument by Daniel Chester French (sculptor of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.) and French’s former student Edward C. Potter.

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  • Ghost

    1964 by Alexander Calder

    Stirling Calder’s son Alexander “Sandy” Calder became famous for sculptures that move. One of his graceful mobiles, Ghost, hangs in the Great Stair Hall of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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  • Government of the People

    1976 by Jacques Lipchitz

    Government of the People

    After fleeing Europe before World War II, Jacques Lipchitz ended up in New York, where he became one of the 20th century’s major artists. Some of his best work is in Philadelphia, including the monumental Government of the People, a 30-foot, totem-like sculpture in the Municipal Services Building Plaza. Among the twining human limbs, look for a family group (father, mother and child) at the bottom and a man and woman at the top holding a form that represents the Philadelphia banner.

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  • I have a story to tell you …

    2003 by Pepón Osorio

    Embedded in the glass walls and ceiling of a casita (little house), enlarged photographs tell a story — or many stories — about Philadelphia’s vibrant Latino community. Using images contributed by local residents, artist Pepón Osorio created the structure as a “community photograph album” of shared experiences. This work at Congreso de Latinos Unidos grew out of the Fairmount Park Art Association’s New•Land•Marks program. Osorio added similar images in two windows of the adjacent headquarters building.

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  • Joan of Arc

    1890 by Emmanuel Frémiet

    Joan of Arc

    On 25th Street facing the museum, an inspiring Joan of Arc carries her standard into battle. Sculptor Emmanuel Frémiet cast identical monuments for Philadelphia and Paris. Only in Philadelphia, though, is the heroine known as “Joanie on a Pony.”

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  • John B. Kelly (The Rower)

    1965 by Harry Rosin

    Statue of John B. Kelly.

    With Boathouse Row and miles of challenging river, Philadelphia has long been a center for rowing enthusiasts. Who better to represent this tradition than Olympic champion John B. Kelly Sr., who won the single sculls in 1920 and the doubles in 1920 and 1924. A bronze sculpture of Kelly at the oars is located near the rowing grandstands.

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  • Kensington Kinetic Sculpture Derby

    At the races

    The Kensington Kinetic Sculpture Derby is the featured event at the Trenton Ave. Arts Fest.

    Since 2007, Fishtown’s to-the-north neighbor Kensington has held this one-of-a-kind competition, which sees teams building amazing, elaborate sculptures that also happen to be downhill-raceable vehicles.

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  • King Solomon

    1968 by Alexander Archipenko

    Statue of King Solomon.

    The biblical Solomon might not have recognized himself in Alexander Archipenko’s Cubist-influenced bronze, but for modern-day viewers the work is richly evocative. There’s a stern dignity and perhaps a hint of self-righteousness in the king’s bolt upright pose with the points of his robe or cloak framing his head.

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  • Kopernik

    1972 by Dudley Talcott

    Kopernik

    A committee of Polish Americans commissioned this sculpture to honor Mikolaj Kopernik, known to most English speakers as Nicolaus Copernicus, on the 500th anniversary of his birth. Kopernik was the Renaissance astronomer who boldly theorized that the earth and other planets rotate around the sun. Sculptor Dudley Talcott symbolizes the sun with stainless steel disks and the earth’s orbit with a 16-foot ring.

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  • Lion Crushing a Serpent

    1832 by Antoine-Louis Barye

    Lion Crushing a Serpent in Rittenhouse Square.

    French sculptor Antoine-Louis Barye helped establish a 19th-century school known as the animaliers, artists who focused on animal subjects, frequently as stand-ins for human emotions. Barye’s portrayal of a lion subduing a serpent illustrates his fondness for dramatic animal battles.

    The lion, however, is not an ordinary beast. It represents the French monarchy, and the serpent is a universal symbol of evil. Hence this sculpture convinced the French king to name Barye to the Legion of Honor.

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  • LOVE Statue

    1976 by Robert Indiana

    LOVE statue in Love Park Philadelphia

    The City of Brotherly Love’s best-known landmark is LOVE itself — the Robert Indiana sculpture in John F. Kennedy Plaza, northwest of City Hall. Installed in 1976, LOVE was briefly snatched away in 1978, but popular demand brought it back where it belongs.

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  • Major

    1982 by Charles Fahlen

    Charles Fahlen's Major.

    A huge pile of children’s blocks? A monumental arch with a kid-sized opening? A stiff-backed figure resembling an old military man? However you see it, Charles Fahlen’s colorful concrete structure — all 53,000 pounds of it — is both playful and provocative.

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