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  • Dog Days of Summer Cook-Off

    A hot summer festival focusing on a summer classic

    The Shambles at Headhouse Square house a hot summer festival focused on the summer classic — hot dogs — on Saturday, July 19.

    Twenty of the area’s top restaurants and food trucks compete for the title of Top Grill Master during the Third Annual Dog Days of Summer Cook-Off. And the medium of choice: hot dogs.

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  • Dolley Todd (Madison) House

    Home of the woman who would become First Lady

    Home of the woman who would become First Lady View More
  • Dream Garden

    Louis Comfort Tiffany meets Maxfield Parrish in a one-of-a-kind creation

    The Dream Garden

    One of only three such works ever undertaken by Tiffany Studios, the piece is comprised of 24 panels that took six months to install in its Philadelphia setting. In 1998, after the piece was put up for sale and casino magnate Steve Wynn attempted to purchase it, a citywide outcry nixed the deal, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts purchased its alumnus’ famous Dream Garden to make sure it would remain where it has always been.

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  • Drexel Park

    Spectacular skyline views from the west side

    Both Powelton residents and Drexel students flock to this 2.5-acre oasis for its walking paths, benches and open green space, where picnics, Frisbee games, reading and sunbathing are the main activities. And that view—it makes a typical day in the park visually stunning.

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  • Duck Girl

    1911 by Paul Manship

    Duck Girl in Rittenhouse Square Park

    A young woman, classically draped (with a bit of strategic undraping), strides gracefully with a duck in one hand. No known symbolism invests this work; it’s just pleasant to look at. This is an early sculpture by Paul Manship, best known for his Prometheus in New York’s Rockefeller Center.

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  • Dupree Gallery

    Fine art made accessible by visual artist James Dupree

    This Queen Village institution was founded by artist James Dupree, who’s lauded for his accessible approach to running what many call “the people’s gallery.”

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  • Dylan Gallery

    Fine art on the Piazza

    This Piazza-located gallery focuses on architectural, functional and fine art, including furniture, housewares and jewlery.

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  • Eagle

    1904 by August Gaul

    The Eagle in Macy's Grand Court.

    German sculptor August Gaul’s 2,500-pound bronze bird came to America for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. When John Wanamaker purchased it for his famous department store, he had to strengthen the floor with extra girders. Soon “Meet me at the eagle” became a catchphrase for Philadelphians as well as suburbanites who came downtown to shop.

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  • East Passyunk Restaurant Week

    Eat and explore East Passyunk’s fantastic dining scene

    Now's your chance to get to Noord, one of 24 restaurants participating in East Passyunk Restaurant Week.

    Now in its second year, East Passyunk Restaurant Week is the perfect opportunity to explore the fantastic dining scene one of Philadelphia’s most popular neighborhoods.

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  • Eastern State Penitentiary

    Radical 19th century prison designed to create social change

    The looming exterior of Eastern State Penitentiary

    Eastern State Penitentiary set the standard for penal reform, with its soaring, castle-like Gothic architecture and its founders’ Quaker-inspired belief that solitary confinement could reform criminals.

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  • Eastern State Penitentiary Tour

    See Al Capone’s prison cell

    The looming exterior of Eastern State Penitentiary

    Philadelphia’s massive prison features several dramatic vistas in the prison’s cathedral-like cellblocks.

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  • Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion

    Victorian mansion of the upper-middle and upper class

    Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion

    The simplicity of Philadelphia’s Quaker background was no match for the excess of the Victorian era.

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  • Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site

    The house where Poe wrote and published some of his greatest tales

    Edgar Allan Poe House

    Poe (1809-1849), one of America’s most original writers, lived in this red brick home with his wife, Virginia, and his mother-in-law, Maria Clemm, for about a year.

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  • EKG Exhibition Space

    The intersection of art and technology

    The exhibitions and programs at this gallery showcase contemporary art that intersects with advances in science and technology—and all are free and open to the public. A recent expansion includes a program called Breadboard, an art-and-technology hybrid combining 3-D and a collaborative workshop.

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  • Electric Factory

    Supplying live music to Philadelphia for decades

    This four-decades-old live music hall occupies an actual former electric factory. Acts at the standing-room-only venue with a capacity for 2,500-3,000 people span all genres, from indie to pop to classic rock.

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  • Electrical Spectacle Holiday Light
    Show at Franklin Square

    Brilliant bright display inspired by the imagination of Benjamin Franklin

    Electrical Spectacle Holiday Light Show at Franklin Square.

    Winter nights are joyfully brighter this holiday season with Franklin Square’s Electrical Spectacle, a brand-new holiday nighttime light show.

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  • Elfreth’s Alley

    The nation’s oldest continuously inhabited street

    Elfreth's Alley in Philadelphia

    Butchers. Bakers. Candlestick-makers. Named for blacksmith and property-owner Jeremiah Elfreth, Elfreth’s Alley was home to the 18th century artisans and trades-people who were the backbone of colonial Philadelphia.

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  • Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial

    1933–1961

    On a strip of land between the Schuylkill River and Kelly Drive, the Samuel Memorial tells the story of American life through sculpture. Chosen by means of three international exhibitions, the artists included several European immigrants and one from North Africa — fitting for a monument that stresses the nation’s openness, democracy and creative energy. Most of the works are fairly traditional in style, but Jacques Lipchitz’s bold Spirit of Enterprise dominates the central terrace.

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  • Ellen Powell Tiberino Memorial Museum of Contemporary Art

    A hidden art oasis dedicated to a Philadelphia artist

    A sculptural work of art by Ellen Tiberino.

    There’s nowhere quite like this visually arresting shrine to late Philly artist Tiberino, whose unique style of sculpture and mural is spread throughout the space.

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  • Emergence of a Modern Metropolis Walking Tour

    Explore the social, economic and political forces that helped Philadelphia become an architectural jewel

    Highlights include the spectacular Victorian interior of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; the soaring central court of Philadelphia’s first department store, Wanamaker’s (now Macy’s Center City); and the atrium of the brand new Comcast Center, Philadelphia’s tallest skyscraper.

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  • Equality Forum

    The global LGBT event returns to Philadelphia for its 22nd anniversary

    SundayOut! at the Piazza at Schmidts in 2013

    The global LGBT event comes to Philadelphia, featuring more than 20 programs, parties and more

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  • Erdman Hall Dormitory (Higher Education)

    Louis I. Kahn (1914)

    A recent restoration by Bryn Mawr College has returned the distinctive slate and concrete structure to its original condition.

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  • Face Fragment

    1975 by Arlene Love

    A giant, gilded mouth and nose, this sculpture will surely catch your eye, but it was designed as a tribute to other senses — namely, smell and taste, the research interests of the Monell Chemical Senses Center. Sculptor Arlene Love often favors partial figures, which allow her to concentrate on what she considers the essential nature of the subject.

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  • Fairmount Art Center

    Release the artist inside with classes, workshops and more

    Located behind the Perelman Building, the Fairmount Art Center offers a variety of classes and workshops for adults and children in a variety of mediums, from watercolors to jewelry making to mosaics.

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  • Fairmount Arts Crawl

    A day of art and festivities in Philadelphia’s Fairmount neighborhood

    More than 50 artists and 20 venues, along with thousands of visitors, come together in one neighborhood for a day of art, design, music and fun.

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  • Fairmount Park

    One of the world’s largest city park systems

    Biking riding through Fairmount Park

    With more than 9,200 acres of rolling hills, gentle trails, relaxing waterfront and shaded woodlands, Fairmount Park keeps a wealth of natural landscapes within easy reach of all city residents.

    You can take a stroll, head out for an afternoon of softball, organized frisbee or pier-side fishing, or just settle in for a family picnic. There are miles of trails for horseback riding, off-road cycling and deep-woods hiking, yet there are also tours of historic mansions, Japanese tea ceremonies and outdoor concerts. Three environmental centers, as well as a wildlife refuge treatment center, help bring the natural world to life for adults as well as children.

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  • Fairmount Park Horticulture Center

    Home of the Centennial Arboretum — 27 acres of majestic Asian, European and North American trees

    The reflecting pool at the Fairmount Park Horticulture Center

    Home of the Centennial Arboretum — 27 acres of majestic Asian, European and North American trees

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  • Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center

    The nation’s first municipal water treatment center

    Fairmount Water Works

    The Fairmount Water Works, one of Philadelphia’s architectural icons, now is an exciting combination of environmental education, architectural history and cultural heritage.

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  • Fete Day Celebration at Elfreth’s Alley

    Residents on America’s oldest street open their doors for one day only

    Elfreth's Alley, the nation's oldest residental street.

    Get a rare glimpse into a dozen 18th-century private homes of residents on America’s oldest street during Fete Day on Elfreth’s Alley.

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  • Fingerspan

    1987 by Jody Pinto

    The Fingerspan Bridge in the Wissahickon

    Ready for a more rugged hike? In the Wissahickon section of Fairmount Park, the “Form and Function” program commissioned a bridge that resembles a human finger, complete with a “nail” at one end. With this steel span across a picturesque gorge, artist Jody Pinto hoped to make hikers feel a literal connection between the human body and the natural world.

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