Skip to main content

Visitphilly.com Official Visitor And Travel Site
MENU
Kennett Square Bristol Doylestown Jenkintown Manayunk Mt. Airy Chestnut Hill Ardmore Ambler Skippack Phoenixville Wayne Media West Chester New Hope

Valley Forge National Historical Park

King of Prussia, Montgomery County

{caption}

The Historic American Revolution Trail of Greater Philadelphia

Discover the Revolutionary War sites and battlefields in Philadelphia and the Countryside

From the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the writing of our Constitution, Philadelphia has become known as the birthplace of the nation.

But the Revolution didn’t just take place at Independence Hall — a lot of seminal events in the Revolutionary War went down in the Greater Philadelphia area.

This trail will take you to the region’s most significant and fascinating American Revolution sites that helped shape the country, from the authentic camps at Valley Forge to the bombed-out buildings at Fort Mifflin to the spot where George Washington crossed the Delaware River to surprise the British in 1776.

EXPAND MAPCOLLAPSE MAP
View on Map

Hopewell Furnace
National Historic Site

Elverson, Chester County
Hopewell Furnace

An early American “Iron Plantation” — a forerunner of today’s iron and steel industries

A film and self-guided tour at this colonial-era village showcase how revolutionary ironworkers supported Washington’s forces by supplying cannon, shot, shell and even flour. The furnace, which operated until 1883, also produced 115 big guns for the Continental Navy.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Brandywine Battlefield Park

Chadds Ford, Delaware County

The peacefully preserved remains of one of Washington’s few defeats

Most preserved battlefield sites memorialize winning fights, but the Revolutionary Army lost ground at Brandywine. Still, the rolling hills of Brandywine Battlefield Park serve as a memorable addition to any Revolutionary War tour of the Philadelphia area — George Washington used the Benjamin Ring House for his headquarters, and it’s now preserved to look like it did in 1777.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Historic Houses of Chadds Ford

Chadds Ford, Delaware County

Pre-Revolutionary War homes on the National Register of Historic Places

Both the Barns-Brinton House and John Chads’ springhouse suffered damage during the Battle of Brandywine in 1777. Before the battle, Washington himself may have surveyed the Brandywine from a hill behind the Chads’ House.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Waynesborough

Paoli, Chester County

Home of Revolutionary War’s General “Mad” Anthony Wayne

After a hard stint on the frontlines, General “Mad” Anthony Wayne would often return home to Waynesborough for a good night’s sleep. Sustaining surprisingly little damage during the war, the spacious German farmhouse was expanded over the centuries and now features General Wayne’s uniform, Revolutionary War maps and an impressive collection of three centuries of Wayne family furnishings.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Peter Wentz Farmstead

Worcester, Montgomery County

An authentic, working 18th-century Pennsylvania German farm

The Wentz’s Georgian-style stone house also served as HQ for George Washington during the fall of 1777. While here, Washington planned his attempt to keep the British forces from occupying Philadelphia, which resulted in the Battle of Germantown. The site has been restored and the house furnished to reflect its appearance at the time of the Revolution.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Harriton House

Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County

Home of Charles Thomson, secretary of the Continental Congresses

Perched amid 16 acres of parklands, Harriton House quietly holds a place in America’s history. Built in 1704, it eventually became home to Charles Thomson, an abolitionist who became secretary to both Continental Congresses. The original desk where Thomson signed the copy of the Declaration of Independence that was sent to King George is discreetly placed in Harriton’s great hall.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Fort Mifflin

Philadelphia, Philadelphia County
Fort Mifflin

The fort that withstood the greatest bombardment of the American Revolution

Almost 350 Americans died in November 1777 when British forces sent 1,000 cannon rounds every 20 minutes into Fort Mifflin. But the Americans’ valor gave George Washington time to regroup at Valley Forge. Situated on about 40 acres, a complex of approximately eight buildings survives with signs of the bombardment.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Grumblethorpe

Germantown, Philadelphia County
Grumblethorpe

John Wister’s 1740’s Germantown summer home and orchard

Yet another of Germantown Avenue’s magnificent homes that was occupied by the British during the Revolution, Grumblethorpe’s living room floor still shows the blood stain where British Brigadier-General James Agnew died from a sniper’s bullet.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Germantown White House
(Deshler-Morris House)

Germantown, Philadelphia County
Deshler-Morris House

George Washington’s White House in Germantown

The Germantown White House once was home to the two fiercest foes in America’s history. After defeating George Washington in the Battle of Germantown, British General William Howe took over the summer retreat which was empty for the winter. Years later, Washington moved the first family into the home, a precursor to the “White House.” The red sofa in the house is thought to have belonged to Washington.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Wyck

Germantown, Philadelphia County
Wyck

The Quaker way of life preserved for 300 years

A peaceful 50-acre estate initially settled by the Quakers, the Wyck house played a role in the gruesome Battle of Germantown: Hessian troops seized the house and used it as a field hospital, an 18th-century MASH unit.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Cliveden

Mt. Airy, Philadelphia County
Cliveden

A grand mansion with a fascinating — and bloody — history

Now a six-acre oasis in the middle of a bustling Philadelphia neighborhood, Cliveden was an estate in the suburb of Germantown built just before the Revolutionary War. One of the most lavish mansions of its era, the Battle of Germantown was fought in the house’s backyard in October 1777, and dozens of British soldiers holed up inside during the firefight.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Stenton

Mt. Airy, Philadelphia County
Stenton

William Penn’s powerful agent-secretary, James Logan, made Stenton his country seat

Both British General Sir William Howe and General George Washington used Germantown Avenue’s Stenton house as command headquarters in the fall of 1777 -- Washington before the Battle of Brandywine, and Howe during the Battle of Germantown.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Hope Lodge Mather Mill

Fort Washington, Montgomery County

Georgian mansion in colonial and colonial revival decoration

A Georgian estate designed by the architect behind Independence Hall, Hope Lodge Mather Mill served as quarters for Washington’s most dependable general Nathaniel Green and was used as a hospital by Washington's surgeon general John Cochran in the fall of 1777.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

Washington Crossing Historic Park

Washington Crossing, Bucks County
Washington Crossing

Where Washington made his famous trip across the Delaware

On Christmas night, 1776, George Washington and his troops met to secretly cross the Delaware River. His plan: Surprise the British and Hessian troops in Trenton, and it worked: Ten days later, the revolutionaries scored victories at Trenton and Princeton. The park has been preserved as both a historic and nature area, and visitors can attend a reenactment every Christmas day.
View on Map Read More
 
View on Map

The David Library of the American Revolution

Washington Crossing, Bucks County
David Library

Revolutionary War documentation on sacred historical ground

A stone’s throw from where Washington crossed the Delaware, The David Library has nearly eight million pages documenting events from 1750 to 1800 and the American Revolution: diaries, dissertations, correspondence, government records, military service records, newspapers and periodicals. Among these are significant British sources not available anywhere else in the United States.
View on Map Read More
 
Please select a county above
Advertisement:
Advertisement:
#visitphilly
Go To Top